ISO 8601

I am genuinely interested in numbers, and specs. I must be the strange person in other people’s mind, but I am just so excited to see things like numbers. For example:

1. CVC 22651

When travelling in California, I really love the CVC 22651 printed on the TOW AWAY plate, and traced to the following document: http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/vctop/d11/vc22651.htm

2. ISO 8601

The smart guys want to solve a problem of how to represent date across the world (both west and east and both computer or human). So they invented something like:

2012-08-20T13:09:16+08:00

and they call it ISO 8601 format.

3. RFC 2616

Maybe one of the most important RFC. It uses just 4 digits to express that. If you are curious, it is:

Hypertext Transfer Protocol — HTTP/1.1

http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2616.txt

The RFC has been there for 30 years, so I was pretty shocked to know there did exist an RFC 1: http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc0001

4. 200030

This is pretty simple: the post code of the area I am moving around. I love the idea of postal code, but the way it is presented in China is not so up-to-date. The postal code of US seems more interesting, for example, 94301, or Singapore, where they assign a post code for every building.

5. Other random numbers

The more universal numbers are most interesting for me. For example, the ISBN numbers (isbn:0375420827 for the Art of travel), the mobile phone numbers (13916146826 for me), or even PNR.

Why I am so interested in these numbers? I am still puzzled and don’t have an answer. Maybe that is the inborn instinct of an engineer?

One thought on “ISO 8601

  1. Miao, Jun

    I’m so happy that I had accidentally found your blog, I’m so impressed by your knowledge. Would you please tell me why your english is so good, how long have you been studied and how to? Do you know any other people’s blog that also very interesting?
    (I can read chinese, english, japanese.)

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