Long Metro Trains on Line #1

The traditional Metro Train is 6 cart train (from 1995 to 2007).

From this year, there are longer trains, so they put the sticker on the glasses of the door to indicate the location for the first 6 cart, and the following two – cart #7 and cart 8.

When train is approaching, there are broadcast to notify people about the number of train carts in the coming train, so people don’t need to wait before the rest of the gates, where there will be no train carts.

Look at these pictures:

DMG changed screen

The DMG (Digital Media Group) changed the LCD display to some new, and bigger one. Look at these nice display:

11 thoughts on “Long Metro Trains on Line #1

  1. That’s really cool! It’s much more sophisticated than the out-dated subway system in San Francisco that we call BART. I don’t even want to go there for fear of getting shot.

  2. This cool. New York is “designing” the displays to tell the arrival of the train. This is for the 1-7 trains. The L train already has a different type. But these don’t tell the number of trains though which frequently changes. But New York’s runs 24/7. We had a strike once that shutdown the subway & buses due to Labor disputes. MTA makes so much money with $2 subway & bus fare & $5 express bus fare it can definitely pay its workers more.

  3. Amazing the amount of “instant” improvements that can happen in a place where the government has the final say in getting things done and funds it thru whatever means necessary. No votes on taxes or bonds, no environmnetal studies, and very littel notice that the governmnet will be building a mettro system thru your neighborhood and that you now need to move to a new neighborhood, with some finacial assistance form teh govt of course. This is the price of development. Unfortunately, in developed countries and cities (ie the Bay Area, NY Metropolitan area, etc…) it would never happen because it would affect too many people and the lawsuits would keep progress from happeniong for decades. In the meantime, the developing world will leapfrog in terms of technology usage..

    The metro system in Shanghai is quite good though its limited daytime operating schedule is still not quite enough for many who frequent the night scene, but it has enough ridership to keep running and is expanding (from the current 5 lines) to some dozen lines in the next few years. Amazing to watch it develop so rapidly.

  4. “This is the price of development. Unfortunately, in developed countries and cities (ie the Bay Area, NY Metropolitan area, etc…) it would never happen because it would affect too many people and the lawsuits would keep progress from happeniong for decades.”

    It’s never because it affects “too many” people, it’s because it affects people at all. One lawsuit by one Luddite sociopath can derail a plan that would benefit a million people. Individual rights vs civic rights – it won’t matter once China eclipses the United States anyway.

  5. I found your website through Google on an unreleated search. You wield blogging nicely. where can a novice like myself start my own secure blog on a new domain?

    Cheers,

    Mike

  6. yu888: I do agree that we take regulations too far in the United States.

    However, by skipping the “environmental studies” in China, have you seen the blackened waters in rivers? Or the perpetual haze in the sky?

    Sky in Shanghai:

    http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=Shanghai&btnG=Search+Images

    Sky in Washington, D.C.:

    http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&hl=en&safe=off&q=washington%2C+D.C.&btnG=Search

    We collectively decided that we want clean air and clean water. The extra bit of economic development is not worth it.

    Ben: Don’t get too cocky yet. The United States is the wealthiest country in the world. The GDP of the United States greater than the next 4 largest economies in the world. China is not going to be the world’s cheap factory forever. China’s economy is not going to grow at 10% per year forever either.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

(Spamcheck Enabled)